Monthly Archives: March 2019

This Book Is Dangerous (again)

In 1927, Italian Futurist artist and designer Fortunato Depero published his groundbreaking monograph Depero Futurista, or “Depero the Futurist,” which became commonly known as “The Bolted Book” because of its large aluminum fasteners. The avant-garde masterpiece had an imaginative layout, experimental typography, … Continue reading

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The Carrier of Ladders

This week the two-time Poet Laureat of the U.S. and two-time Pulitzer prizewinning poet W.S. Merwin died at the age of 91. One of America’s best known and loved writers, Merwin managed to weave themes of spirituality, politics, relationships, and … Continue reading

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All Roads Lead To Rome (eventually)

Once again, Chicago-based cartographer and artist Sasha Trubetskoy has created an amazing transit-themed map based on the ancient Roman road network. This terrific example, Roman Roads of Iberia, is based on historic sources and covers the period of the First Century BC … Continue reading

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Free Books For Travelers

Hub City Books and the Hub City Writers Project in Sparatanburg, S.C., have launched Free Books for Travelers, a new community outreach project. Travelers passing through the Sparta Passenger Center are encouraged to take a free book along for the … Continue reading

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Tilting At Windmills

Don Quixote of the Mancha re-told by Judge Parry Illustrated by Walter Crane London Blackie & Son Limited 1900 First Edition thus  

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Awful Books

One of my guilty pleasures is checking in periodically with this hilarious website dedicated to really terrible books. The Awful Library Books blog is the passion project of two professional librarians from the State of Michigan. Mary Kelly and Holly Hibner collect … Continue reading

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The Highest and the Shortest

Unless you are a skier or a public transit geek, it’s not likely that you have ever heard of, or visited, the Austrian village of Serfaus. The lovely little town with a population of around 1,200 is renowned for its … Continue reading

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It’s still Constantinople to me

As is often the case in the antiquarian book trade, we can search for a title for weeks with no avail and then years later stumble across a copy when we are not even looking. Many years ago I had … Continue reading

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New House for the Bauhaus

This year marks the centennial of the founding of the Bauhaus movement. This world renowned school of art and design has had a dramatic impact on architecture and design around the world.  On April 6, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar will … Continue reading

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Citizenship in the land of knowledge

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